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Introducing: Your New Essential Guide To Science Advocacy

Our new guide is a collaborative project that was initiated by Senator Kutcher and the Chief Scientist of Québec, Dr. Rémi Quirion, with generous support from the Fonds de recherche du Québec.

Today, we’re excited to announce that our brand new Essential Guide to Science Advocacy is now available. Whether you work in the physical sciences or the humanities, this will be your new starting point to explore the foundational knowledge and tools necessary to effectively engage in advocacy as a researcher.

Our new guide is a collaborative project that was initiated by Senator Stanley Kutcher and the Chief Scientist of Québec, Dr. Rémi Quirion, and developed by Evidence for Democracy, with generous support from the Fonds de recherche du Québec. We developed this guide because we all benefit when scientists are equipped and empowered to raise their voices and advocate effectively.

Whether you want to dip your toes into advocacy for the first time, or are looking to fine-tune your skills, this guide will help you expand your toolbox of advocacy strategies, and build and nurture relationships with decision-makers.

Fostering a better relationship between scientists and policy-makers is not just about enabling ground-breaking discoveries or strengthening the economy. It’s also about how science can serve the collective good — for a healthier, more prosperous, and just society.

Within the guide, you will also find firsthand experiences from parliamentarians reflecting on their experiences interacting with the science community. Personally, I’m still thinking about this quote:

“Conversations around science are frequently centered around funding. They are less often about how [the] government can make better evidence informed decisions using the research that is being produced by the stakeholders I meet with.” — Member of Parliament

It’s clear: our efforts to advocate for science must be broader, and there is much more work to be done to strengthen the relationship between science, policy and society.

Advocacy will not bear fruit overnight. It is an ongoing process that requires persistence and continued and open dialogue. Nor can success be achieved without the collective efforts of motivated scientists, empowered with the knowledge and tools to advocate effectively.

It is our hope that our new Essential Guide To Science Advocacy inspires and helps you in your science advocacy. We encourage you to build and nurture relationships with decision-makers, and to work collaboratively towards a healthy science and research ecosystem and strong evidence-informed public policies, for the benefit of all Canadians.

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