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OTTAWA (March 31, 2014) – An agreement has been reached to transfer the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) research center from under the auspices of the Government of Canada to a non-profit organization, the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD). The ELA, a collection of 58 lakes in northwestern Ontario, has conducted ground-breaking research on the impacts of environmental problems – such as acid rain, climate change, and mercury pollution – on lakes and fish populations for over four decades.

A supporter sent us this moving letter from concerned citizens in Kenora to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Minister of the Environment, and the Minister of State for Science and Technology regarding the closure of many federal science libraries across the country. Here is an excerpt:

We are worried and concerned about the elimination and doom of DFO programs and libraries and Canada’s ability to do science which will protect the natural world.

The following is a blog post written by E4D supporter and conservation ecologist Alejandro Frid. It was originally posted to Conservation Bytes. Artists, poets and musicians make us feel, viscerally, how people destroy what they do not understand. Logic and observation lead E. O. Wilson to conclude: ‘If people don’t know, they don’t care. If they don’t care, they don’t act.’ Whether you feel it in one of Drew Dillinger’s poems or visualize it from the sinuous beauty of mathematical equations, the song remains the same. Scientists are critical to the present and future of the biosphere and humanity, but if — and only if — we are free to communicate our findings to the voting public.

The following opinion piece by E4D Executive Director Katie Gibbs appeared in iPolitics on November 17th 2013.

Is it time for scientists to leave the lab and enter the political fray?

A report released today by the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC) based on a survey of federal scientists indicates that many believe censoring and suppression of publicly-funded science is widespread. These results provide additional evidence for concerns about the muzzling of federal scientists, and highlight the need for new less restrictive communication policies.