Because science is for everyone.

We need your help to make this year’s March for Science events successful!

Whether you plan to attend an event, volunteer with a local organizing team, or even plan your own event, please sign-up below to join the March for Science movement in Canada.

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Eric Fisher. In this post Eric outlines the highlights of our recent Science and Social Media webinar with Samantha Yammine. 

 Dr. Eric Fisher is a scientist and entrepreneur. Eric earned his PhD at Dalhousie University, where he investigated how liver cells produce and destroy "bad cholesterol" particles. Eric then founded a startup called Labfundr, Canada's first crowdfunding platform for science. Eric lives in Halifax with his wife and dog, both of whom are smarter than him. Find him on Twitter @EricF1sher.

To answer this question, Evidence for Democracy partnered with the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) to host an online town hall. Dr. Paul Kushner, Dr. Laxmi Sushama, and Dr. James Drummond joined us to share their take on the question and a bit about their research.

January 22, 2018 (Ottawa, ON) - Hundreds of prominent international scientists specializing in climate and atmospheric science released an open letter today urging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to re-invest in climate science.

Hundreds of prominent international scientists specializing in climate and atmospheric science released an open letter urging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to re-invest in climate science.

In June, The Liberal government introduced Bill C-58 to amend the Access to Information Act, which hasn’t been updated since its introduction in 1983.

There are some positive changes in the bill, including a regular five-year review to the act, and new powers for the Information Commissioner to compel governments to release requested information.

Despite these improvements, the bill falls significantly short of the Liberal’s campaign promises and introduces some troubling new authority for departments to deny requests.

In this guest blog post, Samantha Yammine examines why the choice of Dr. Nemer as Chief Science Advisor is important to both Canadian science, and herself personally. 

Samantha Yammine is a Science Communicator and PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto researching how stem cells build and maintain the brain. She makes science fun and friendly by sharing it daily on instagram.com/science.sam. Chat with her more about this on Twitter @SamanthaZY, or visit samanthayammine.com for more.

 

Here's an excerpt from our op-ed published in the Ottawa Citizen on June 14th. Read the full article here

Since the election of Donald Trump, Canada has been distancing itself from U.S. policies on everything from immigration to human rights to science.

Science Integrity Policies for federal government departments - what are they, what do they do, and what has been promised?