In June, The Liberal government introduced Bill C-58 to amend the Access to Information Act, which hasn’t been updated since its introduction in 1983.

There are some positive changes in the bill, including a regular five-year review to the act, and new powers for the Information Commissioner to compel governments to release requested information.

Despite these improvements, the bill falls significantly short of the Liberal’s campaign promises and introduces some troubling new authority for departments to deny requests.

In this guest blog post, Samantha Yammine examines why the choice of Dr. Nemer as Chief Science Advisor is important to both Canadian science, and herself personally. 

Samantha Yammine is a Science Communicator and PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto researching how stem cells build and maintain the brain. She makes science fun and friendly by sharing it daily on instagram.com/science.sam. Chat with her more about this on Twitter @SamanthaZY, or visit samanthayammine.com for more.

 

Here's an excerpt from our op-ed published in the Ottawa Citizen on June 14th. Read the full article here

Since the election of Donald Trump, Canada has been distancing itself from U.S. policies on everything from immigration to human rights to science.

Science Integrity Policies for federal government departments - what are they, what do they do, and what has been promised?

The review panel makes sweeping recommendations for overhauling how energy projects are assessed and approved.

Press Release                                           
For immediate release

 

OTTAWA SCIENTISTS ‘MARCH FOR SCIENCE’ ON PARLIAMENT HILL, JOINING LARGEST SCIENCE DEMONSTRATION IN HISTORY

 

Bring your signs, your energy, your friends, and your passion for science.

Ahead of the March for Science, Katie Gibbs & Kathleen Walsh detail how the Canadian science community is unifying around the Fundamental Science Review, and why the March's message is still relevant in Canada. 

“Public science affects all of us - from clean drinking water to making sure bridges and roads are safe - it’s in all of our best interest to ensure that government science is independent, robust and openly communicated.” said Katie Gibbs, report author with Evidence for Democracy. “When government research has the resources necessary to carry out its mandate, it is less vulnerable to influence from external contractors, political pressure, and stakeholder interests.”