It’s a case study in facts vs. misinformation. Last week the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a long-awaited report; a “scientific blueprint” for how we can reach the global goals agreed to in Paris in 2015.

Ontario has cancelled its cap and trade system, which was created to reduce the province’s greenhouses gas (GHG) emissions. Premier Doug Ford has also promised to oppose implementing the federal carbon tax.

When decision-makers need to make a call about policy, where do they get their information from? Who helps to inform their decisions? How do they weigh information coming from different sources such as their party, local constituents, and external players like lobbyists, and think tanks?  What kind of data are they able to take into account, and how?

Science Communication 102

Join us on October 23rd at 2pm ET to learn how to effectively tell your science story as a narrative. 

Objective, sound, and robust science, evidence, and data are needed to inform policy. When government decisions are made on the best available evidence, our health, environment, economy, and communities benefit

The Parliamentary Committee on Finance (FINA) accepted 2,000 word submissions in advance of the 2019 federal budget. 

Join us on August 22nd, at 2 PM ET to talk the basics of science communication from an audience-focused, research-supported perspective.

 

Laurentian University researchers Jackie Litzgus and David Lesbarrères discuss the issue of highway-related road mortality in Ontario reptile and amphibian species.

This is an excerpt from an op-ed authored by our Katie Gibbs and Kathleen Walsh, published in the Ottawa Citizen on July 20th, 2018. Read the full article here.

Ontario Premier Doug Ford promised to provide “value for money” when it comes to tax dollars spent on the public service. Days after taking office, he required the public service to cancel all subscriptions to newspapers and other sources of information, and freeze all travel outside the province.