A supporter sent us this moving letter from concerned citizens in Kenora to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Minister of the Environment, and the Minister of State for Science and Technology regarding the closure of many federal science libraries across the country. Here is an excerpt:

We are worried and concerned about the elimination and doom of DFO programs and libraries and Canada’s ability to do science which will protect the natural world.

Evidence for Democracy is partnering with Situating Science to bring you an exciting event on March 5th!

 

Evidence for Democracy's co-founder, Dr. Scott Findlay, will be giving a public lecture at Dalhousie University as part of the Lives of Evidence lecture series. His talk is called Governing in the Dark: Evidence, Accountability and the Future of Canadian Science. 

 

You can watch the live stream here at 6:30pm EST: https://evidencefordemocracy.ca/livesofevidence

There are a number of exciting E4D events coming up!

Katie Gibbs will be speaking in Toronto as part of Freedom to Read Week

What: Talk and screening of Silence of the Labs documentary
When: Saturday, March 1st
1pm - 2pm : Screening of Silence of the Labs
2pm - 3pm: Talk by Katie Gibbs
Where: Jane/Dundas Library 620 Jane St.

Joint the Facebook event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/526619310784715/

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MEDIA RELEASE The federal government is soliciting feedback on their consultation paper - Seizing Canada’s moment: moving forward in science, technology and innovation - to inform a revised science, technology and innovation strategy to be released later this year. This will update a strategy adopted in 2007 entitled Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage. “Most of the questions posed in the consultation paper are focused on business innovation,” said Dr. Scott Findlay, Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa. “While business innovation is certainly important for our economic prosperity, many other aspects of Canadian science are equally important for the long-term well-being of Canadians.”

Make sure to watch the Fifth Estate this Friday, January 10, at 9pm EST for 'Silence of the Labs'.

The following is a blog post written by E4D supporter and conservation ecologist Alejandro Frid. It was originally posted to Conservation Bytes. Artists, poets and musicians make us feel, viscerally, how people destroy what they do not understand. Logic and observation lead E. O. Wilson to conclude: ‘If people don’t know, they don’t care. If they don’t care, they don’t act.’ Whether you feel it in one of Drew Dillinger’s poems or visualize it from the sinuous beauty of mathematical equations, the song remains the same. Scientists are critical to the present and future of the biosphere and humanity, but if — and only if — we are free to communicate our findings to the voting public.

The following opinion piece by E4D Executive Director Katie Gibbs appeared in iPolitics on November 17th 2013.

Is it time for scientists to leave the lab and enter the political fray?

November 9th - Ottawa

E4D’s Executive Director, Katie Gibbs, will be speaking at Media Democracy Days (http://mddottawa.ca/) in Ottawa. Talk starts at 1:30pm in Lamoureux Hall (145 Jean-Jacques Lussier) room 242. 

November 13th - Halifax

Get Science Right event in Halifax hosted by the CAUT. Event starts at 7pm at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

November 18th - Toronto

This letter to the editor from E4D's Executive Director was published in the Hill Times today: Contrary to the scenario that Mel Cappe’s comments suggest in last weeks article on communication policies for government scientists (The Hill Times, Oct. 28, pg. 41), the documented cases of government scientists being prohibited from talking to the media are not cases of scientists trying to “go public” with information or “go out and embarrass the government” over policy decisions they did not like. In many of the most notable instances, the government scientists in question (e.g. Kristi Miller, Scott Dallimore, David Tarasick) were not permitted to do interviews to discuss their peer-reviewed research that had already been published in internationally renowned scientific journals.

A report released today by the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC) based on a survey of federal scientists indicates that many believe censoring and suppression of publicly-funded science is widespread. These results provide additional evidence for concerns about the muzzling of federal scientists, and highlight the need for new less restrictive communication policies.