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This is a guest blog post from Farah Qaiser, who is a graduate student at the University of Toronto. As vocal #WomenInSTEM advocates started creating and sharing Wikipedia pages, Farah decided to try out editing Wikipedia too. Read on to find out more about the ongoing global quest to improve the coverage of female and minority scientists on Wikipedia, and how you too can take part in this form of science advocacy at an Edit-A-Thon or from the comfort of your own home.

We’ve reached a dangerous point in time where the answers to “what is true” and “who to trust” dominate the debate on important issues like climate change, vaccines, and immigration. Reality is apparently even debatable for seemingly unimportant issues like crowd sizes and the price of beer in Ontario.

Vaccination: Protection for You and Me

Our world has changed dramatically over the last century due to advances in modern science. Were we living in 1900, it would come as no surprise to have our health threatened by infectious disease, but today this possibility rarely crosses our minds.

It’s a case study in facts vs. misinformation. Last week the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a long-awaited report; a “scientific blueprint” for how we can reach the global goals agreed to in Paris in 2015.

Objective, sound, and robust science, evidence, and data are needed to inform policy. When government decisions are made on the best available evidence, our health, environment, economy, and communities benefit